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20120926
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
views on the global economy and perhaps you could start with europe and make your way around the world and perspective on what you see in terms of growth and perhaps more importantly you know, what are the challenges that we are going to have to deal with over the next period of time? >> there's not enough time for all the challenges but let me give you some perspective. let me get to -- let me give away the punchline. the punchline is i think in a world races, the world is not going to come to coming to an end. we are going to muddle through but there are a lot of challenges and a lot of risks that i think the largest outcome come the largest for signage likely outcome by far is that we get through it and a lot of action were to be taken to offer some relief but there are several things that could cause things to derail in which case it would be a lot tougher for a lot longer. but you asked about europe. i think the biggest problem that europe has is growth and the risk problem is the go off the rail, bus stop of the euro. a few months ago we would have said that the two big issues fo
has been participating, provided a substitute economy and afghanistan to start up allow me to develop so far. is that the incentive? is there some economic incentive that brings them into this process? is it that that's going to solve the problem is it's not constitutional matters in human rights and everything clicks >> we need to start reducing the amount of money these then on afghanistan. >> howell to be sustainable within itself? >> the economic process is one where we have to keep helping the afghans fun the development for 10 years beyond what they get on with developing the mineral resources. at the same time, trying to execute a political process to reduce the pressure in the security forces and wouldn't have to be so proficient if there is a political process. you have to work on all these things at once. i've always said we must make our strategy dependent on the political deal with the taliban because that gives them a veto. you have to be a policy that says, here's the strategy that is not dependent on the taliban. the taliban to stop inciting and get an engaged the proce
on domestic issues including the economy and jobs. the second debate on the campus of hofstra university. politico has this piece about jim leher. for the first time in the 2012 campaign, the president and mitt romney will face each other in what many consider the most important even between now and november 6. for the 12th time in the history of debates, jim leher has been asked to serve as moderator making him the most experienced a moderator and the modern history, he is uniquely suited according to his contemporary. at a time when the electorate is as divided as ever and wind -- media scrutiny is -- next is hayley. welcome to the program. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. i am one of the people who spend every summer for the last few summers going around the nation asking questions. my main question is, what do people think politically and what they are paying attention to. you say are a third party is relevant, yes, they are. they will never get any kind of support as long as the american people are more interested in things like "dancing with the stars." that is a
, and yes, we have taken it to account the kind of shocks the could apply to economies if and when, which i hope is never, the price of oil and the price of energy was to skyrocket more than it is at the moment. but you could take pretty much any area of the world where there are latin complex, not that want to minimize iran clearly, but all such conflicts could themselves entail economic consequences that we have to be mindful of when we model. i don't want to sort of list those parts of the world where conflicts could arise and would have consequences, but this is, you know, as beckett used to say, this is life and his no cure for that. [laughter] >> next question. >> hello, thank you for your talk this morning. i'm with china centric television in washington, d.c. and my question is regarding china but in relation to the global financial crisis, what policy decisions and actions which are like to see from china in the coming months? >> i think policy decisions have been announced already very much so. i'll distinguish between short-term and medium-term. short term there's an announcement
the fallout of the crisis threatens the u.s. economy on your 401k. amy kellogg joins us from london with more. >> reporter: it affects your 401k was the markets of course are corelated and the markets in europe are down. also the s&p derives a significance portion of its earnings from european then american companies have operations overseas that make money in europe, therefore if the economy here is in a bad way that hurts americans. there was this big strike in greece today that got violent when some black-hooded anarchists kind of took advantage of the situation, throwing gasoline bombs at police. they used a general strike and march as a vehicle to just rage against authority. over 50,000 people came out. they are processing the further cuts that are coming their way . many in greece are generally desperate now having seen their salaries drop by more than 20% already since austerity became a way of life in greece. social safety networks are not able to save people. one person at the demonstration was quoted as saying, we are bleeding, we can't take it any more. the new conservative-led co
under some of the strongest sanctions today. oil exports have been correct. the iranian economy has been hit hard. it does have an effect on the economy. we must face the truth. sanctions have not stopped iran's nuclear program. according to the international atomic energy agency, during the last year alone, iran has doubled the number of energy uses in its underground nuclear facility. at this late hour, there is only one way to peacefully prevent iran from getting atomic bombs, and that is by placing a clear red line on iran's nuclear weapons program. [applause] red lines do not lead to war. they prevent war. look at nato's charter. it made clear that an attack on one member country would be considered an attack on all. red lines have helped keep the peace in europe for nearly half a century. and help preserve the peace for decades. it is the failure to place red lines that has often invited aggression. if it were drawn in the 1930's, world war ii might have been avoided. the first gulf war might have been avoided. clear, red lines will also work with iran. earlier this year, they thre
the economy. the reserve bank of australia is worried about the fallout from slowing growth in the world. the rba decided on tuesday to lower the benchmark rate by 0.25 percentage points to 3.25% effective on wednesday. over the past five mos, it has cut the rate by a total of one percentage point. in a statement, governor glen stevens expressed concerns about the effects of austerity programs in europe and slower growth in china, which is australia's major iron ore importer. he said the country's labor market has softened somewhat and that its growth outlook for next year has become a little weaker. >>> the u.s. federal reserve chief says he'll keep pumping money into the economy. chairman ben bernanke says this round of quantitative easing will continue until he sees an improvement in the job situation. >> we would continue securities purchases and employ other policy tools until the outlook for the job market improves substantially in a context of price stability. >> bernanke said the country's economy is improving but not fast enough to reduce unemployment. fed officials decided last
the economy's getting better. i trustresident obama now to lehe ecy. i m who's up against huge unemployment numbers. you can rattle through all the economic data that should not be good for president obama. and yet in three or four states that matter, the tide is switching on those questions. >> don't you think florida is shocking? of those three, i tught florida nine points is the most ki >>nnepoll, florida four points in "the washington post" poll. i've said it for months, any repuican candidate that's losing the state of flori has serious problems. >> willie's right, the economic numbers are huge. the othething that relates is e geer g. inseesuiipia polls. the gender gap is gigantic. why did the romney campaign have as their surrogates bay buchanan and liz cheney and kelly ayotte? because they have a huge gender problem, and they're not addressingt with these daily attacks on the president's so-called es >> ry o"leno" last night. i didn't see the whole thing, but the clips i saw, i don't know. i know that's tough to say, but the relatability issue is constant. >> you know, and there's a
:30. and it could move the market, especially a big build in inventory finding a very slow economy and we're also going to get a ten o'clock new home sales numbers and normally they do not directly affect the market and we'll see coming up at ten o'clock this morning and you will have the numbers. the opening bell has stopped, it's stopped ringing and now they're actually trading and we're expecting a modest, actually, we're expecting a flat market to start with. flat to slightly lower, because of what's happening in europe, mayhem over there, especially in spain and that does not bowed well for america's stock market. we should see. we're dead flat in the half minute's worth of business. perhaps we were hasty when we put the blackberry maker rim, adding they added 2 million subscribers, nicole, i want a stock price. >> am i included in the "we"? i didn't have them on death watch, you may remember. stuart: you're right. >> the death music came on, hold on, what happened yesterday. went up 5% because they added subscribers and 3.3%, and up to 80 million subscribers. stuart: i got it. now, tell me
of the economy in all three states. 51% of polled voters say the president would do the better job. >> okay, let's go back to the last slide, guys. and mark halperin, let's talk to you. i know you agree with me that the media is liberal. guess what? republicans have somehow managed to win despite that media liberal bias. you've said it repeatedly on this show. so despite that fact, mitt romney is not getting crushed in all three of these states because of the liberal media bias. what's happening there, and why is he losing so badly, especially in ohio? >> well, it's very unlikely the president will win those states by those margins, but these numbers are not out of line dramatically with private polling and some other public polling. i think the biggest problem right now remains him. he's not driving a consistent message. the president does -- says something, the republicans get all excited about it. they treat it like a gaffe. they'll talk about it for a day. and then they'll move on to something else. the biggest danger to me right now for the republican party are two things. one is that you l
of europe are. the economy is teetering on the edge of recession. the were seen can do is jacked up taxes on small businesses and entrepreneurs or job creators. that makes it all the more likely to push us into a recession. and for the 23 million people who struggling for work, the worst thing to do is hurt the small businesses that create those jobs. >> it is fair to say that the president has reduced taxes. he has reduced taxes for small businesses 18 times. he cut taxes for '95 -- for 95% of families out there. the question is do we ask everybody to sacrifice? when you look at the marginal rate in the united states, when ronald reagan took office, the marginal office with 71% to 72%. it is interesting to me that the greatness that people speak of in terms of the united states, when we talk about the 1940's, the 1950's, the 1960's, 1970's, the marginal rate that folks paid was much greater. nobody says we will go back to that. at the same time, during the clinton years, we had marginal rates that were a little bit higher than they are now and we had some of the best economic times that
help develop it. from the next economy, to the next generation, we help get... the most out of business, by getting the best out of people. shrm. leading people, leading organizations. not in this economy. we also have zero free time, and my dad moving in. so we went to fidelity. we looked at our family's goals and some ways to help us get there. they helped me fix my economy, the one in my house. now they're managing my investments for me. and with fidelity, getting back on track was easier than i thought. call or come in today to take control of your personal economy. get one-on-one help from america's retirement leader. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. >>> our second story "outfront," mitt romney and president clinton
for india-pakistan relations. it was not such a lousy year for elements of the pakistani economy. we focus on the most dynamic elements. they are not necessarily those that we use as partners after 2008. the most dynamic partners are business people, the media, and it is uneven, but some of the people in the universities. the women's groups, the ngo's. i am not trying to talk about this rosy, friendly, civil society, in a sense that those of us looked to civil society. it is infinitely more complex and more typical than the eurocentric notions would have it. but this is a part of pakistan, where if you talk to the pakistan is, who are furious with the united states -- if you talk to the pakistanis, we want the opportunity, and we want that kind of social link. it would help to build ties with the united states, and put a lot more of our concentration into society where the face of society is the face of your neighbor, the engineer who works in a ditch, the face of a student, the face of your child who has come to america, etc.. our focus on what pakistan is. i am not sure that is going to
. these are difficult decisions. we are going to have to face them. >> fixing the economy tonight at 8:00. >> the former ambassador to pakistan says the u.s. needs a new approach in its relationship with the country. munter talked about how to improve relations with pakistan by working with countries like china and engaging non- governmental institutions within the country. this is 1.5 hours. be >> ladies and gentlemen, good morning and welcome to the stock. -- welcome to this talk. we have the privilege to welcome this morning the ambassador. you have that a long and distinguished career. he did serve in a number of positions in the national security council and the state department. your specialty ended in 2006 when he led the first reconstruction team in iraq. he then became ambassador before returning to the u.s. embassy in baghdad. in 2010, you were sworn in as u.s. ambassador to pakistan. i understand that after you retire, you'll be going to the columbia school of law and follow that with some other academic -- welcome back to the world of academia. you were the u.s. representative in pakistan du
one of the fastest growing economies since south america. also one of the hottest economies in the world. for the last year and a half the country has been run by sebastian panera. he made his fortune bringing credit cards to chile in the late 1970 wrz, richard quest joining us from london. tell us about this. pretty impressive resume for panera. >> not only impressive, but, of course, made international status, hero status, when he led his country's search and rescue off the famous chilean miners last we're. tv the sight of the president constantly always being there with the families that actually moved so much of the world now it's starting to criticize the united states. specifically, quantitative easing. that's the printing of money by the federal reserve. in an exclusive interview you with me the president said that simply printing money in america will not do the trick of rescuing the u.s. economy. >> yes. can you bring money and maybe you can solve the short-term problems. you will never solve the american problem just by printing money. you need to do much more than
, and the stability of the global economy. it risks triggering a nuclear- arms race in the region, and the unraveling of the non- proliferation treaty. that's why a coalition of countries is holding the iranian government accountable. and that's why the united states will do what we must to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. we know from painful experience that the path to security and prosperity does not lie outside the boundaries of international law and respect for human rights. that's why this institution was established from the rubble of conflict. that is why liberty triumphed over tyranny in the cold war. and that is the lesson of the last two decades as well. history shows that peace and progress come to those who make the right choices. nations in every part of the world have traveled this difficult path. europe, the bloodiest battlefield of the 20th century, is united, free and at peace. from brazil to south africa, from turkey to south korea, from india to indonesia, people of different races, religions, and traditions have lifted millions out of poverty, while respecting the ri
were up 4.6%. and what that really depends on the location location location. it is part of the economy, so housing could be a nice component. once again we're not europe so we're ok here. >> let's talk about what's going on with chrysler. >> sales are up 12 percent, it's amazing what happens when you build some nice looking cars. >> later we will get ford, they're not totally immune but we will see automakers' having issues going into foreign markets. >> is that our strongest manufacturer, cars? >> there's been debate as to whether not apple will be part of this dispute. >> i am more interested in goebbels' tablet that is coming out later this fall. it will be a $99 tablet. they came out with a great tablet. amazon continues to come out with my staff cuts. >> how does google make a profit on a $90 tablet? >> apple will tell them it's all about the maps. mobile devices will make the money. them up there been a lot of problems with apple iphone 5. is this a problem? >> apple has a lot of insidious. enthusiasts. >> we will check back at 9:15 a.m. and check out the winners and losers on wa
wants to emphasis in the campaign. he wants the campaign to be obviously about the economy and about our unemployment rate. and it's an unusual position for republican to be in to be running against democrat who has a strong record on national security. i think that's been difficult for the romney campaign, you know, i have worked for both republicans and democrats in various administrations, so i'm not a political person. but if seems to me that republicans always try to run to the right of a democrat and sometimes accuse democrats of being weak on national security. on this election you have president obama who have taken us out of iraq. president obama who has waged a tough war against al qaeda and has gone off the leadership note tbli osama bin laden who has taken out from the terrorist on yemen -- and president obama because of the actions in the very pressive record has boosted american credibility in some parts of the world. governor romney has been trying to assert that president obama is not strong enough on foreign policy. he hasn't supported israel enough. or not as tough as h
the mid-'90s, it was a disaster in the economy of russia. >> rose: you were a financial expert. >> and you know like it was the station where, like different companies in the cities they were on the verge of dying. >> rose: right. >> and we were young, ambitious, risky and we were not afraid of nothing. so we bought a very bad enterprise. >> rose: you made a big bet? >> yes, because at the time we did our best in order to find partners abroad. nobody came because it was too risky. we spent a lot of money, we spent a lot of hours, two and three hours a day, now we can show that this, for example, entity are one of the most profitable entities in the field production of nickel and platinum and palladium. but it was risky at the time because we have debt, more than one year to know the company. can't imagine this. and in the far north people they have no opportunity to receive salary for more than a half year. it was like really a disaster. it was a great disaster. and really we're very proud. >> rose: with so much at stake it all together was not necessarily safe, either. >> it wasn't safe a
and the economy. if you can't get it right it's time to get out. >> all right. well, other than that, if we all agree, what is the hold-up? mitch albom is "outfront" tonight. he's author of "the time keeper." number one fiction on "the new york times" best-seller list. mitch, great to see you. it's obviously been reported two sides are meeting today. what are the odds that this is going to get settled? >> not so great. they are actually still pretty far apart. you would wonder why a league that makes $9 billion in revenue is worried about maybe about $10 million apart on a package for the referees, but it's a bit of a power struggle going on and those on the inside say even with all this controversy and these terrible -- it wasn't just that one, it was a whole weekend's worth of bad plays, it still may not be settled any time immediately. >> let's go through some of the sticking points, just because i found it so ironic that you have governors who don't like unions saying bring back the union refs. there was a lot of irony in it. i know the league wants to do away with the pension plan, replace
afghanistan where the bulk of the troop surgeinciy unfolded, the economy is principally agricultural. most men are working the fieldsv were doing some sort of job that is related to agriculture. the u.s. government includedhemh pghtly that one key way to helo the afghan people would be toze, the farming toh try to provide them with somes o better seeds and fertilizer and in some cases, tractors and try to improve what they were goingl so thatle you would improve ther livelihood as a result, he woull sort of helped them out. so the problem was we tried to do too much of it at once. a h think of southern afghanistan and the farmers there is a of i, parched amman on a hot day.m ine instead of giving them a tall glass of ice water, we literallt turned the fire hose on him, ruining him on the process. beig we tried to pour so much moneypd in bed it wound up becomingy, counterproductive. this was a program that was trying to spend $300 million in and just two provinces in one year. not surprisingly, we wound upr t shoveling the goods of afghanthy and they drove it over to the border to pakistan and
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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